Law Office of Eli M. Kantor
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(310) 274-8216 9595 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 405 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 fax (310) 273-6016 | eli@elikantorlaw.com

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Catering To the Entertainment Industry
USE THE LAW FIRM THAT THE STARS USE

Law Office of Eli M. Kantor

 

The Law Offices of Eli M. Kantor is located right in the heart of the world famous Golden Triangle in Beverly Hills, right across the street from WME. It has has helped many world-class studios, such as Legendary Pictures, Asylum Entertainment, Starz, Tyler Perry Studios  and Film Roman and world class entertainers, including actors, directors, cinematographers, 3D producers, composers,dj's, animators, set designers, make-up artists, stuntmen, authors and screen writers resolve all of their immigration matters by obtaining O-1 visas and EB-1 Green Cards. Our partial client list includes: Academy Award winning actress, Juliette Binoche (Godzilla), Academy Award Nominated and Golden Globe Winning Actress Sally Hawkins (Godzilla), BAFTA Award nominated actress Noomi  Rapace, (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo), Academy Award Winning Director, Juan Campanella, (El Secreto de Sus Ojos), BAFTA Award Nominated Director, Gareth Edwards,( Godzilla, Monsters), BAFTA Award Winning Director, Duncan Jones (Warcraft), BAFTA Award Nominated Actor Aaron Taylor Johnson (Godzilla),BAFTA Award nominated actor, Tom Hiddleston, (Thor), BAFTA Award nominated actor, Toby Kebbell, (The Fantastic Four), Hollywood Film Award winning actress, Tian Jian, (The Great Wall), AFI Award Winning Production Designer, Owen Paterson (The Matrix), Emmy Award Winning Set Designer, Shirley Injet, (The X-Files), Academy Award Nominated Cinematographer, Seamus McGarvey (Atonement), Assistant Director, Luc Etienne (Godzilla), Emmy Award Nominated Make up Artist Victoria Down (Godzilla), Genie Award Winning Sound Mixer Michael McGee (Godzilla), Genie Award Nominated Boom Operator Charles O'Shea (Godzilla), Gemini Award Nominated Make up Artist Christopher Pinhey (Godzilla), ADG Excellence in Production Design Award Nominated Supervising Art Director Grant Van Der Slagt (Godzilla), Saturn Award Nominated SPFX Coordinator Joel Whist (Godzilla), Satellite Award Nominated Set Decorator Elizabeth Wilcox (Godzilla), Actor, Chacko Vadaketh (2012: Ice Age), Line Producer Erin Smith (Taken), Cinematographer, Javier Aguirre Sarobe (Twilight),Cinematographer, Serge Ladouceur (Supernatural) Cinematographer, Derick Underschultz (In Treatment),AFI Award Winning Visual Effects Supervisor, Christopher Godfrey, (Australia), 3D Producer, Marcus Alexander (Godzilla), Hair and Make-up Artist, Tara Smith (Sex and the City," the film") Writer, Fiona Horne, New York Times Best Selling Author of Journey to Rainbow Island, Christie HsiaoLiterary Editor, Deborah Kaufman, Taurus Award Winning Stuntwoman, Zoe Bell (Kill Bill), Stuntwoman, Samantha Thjia (Suckerpunch, Man of Steel, 300),Academy Award Winning Composer, Alexandre Desplat (Godzilla, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Monuments Men, Zero Dark Thirty, Argo), Score and Music Producer, Dominique LeMonnier (Zero Dark Thirty, Fantastic Mr. Fox),Radio and Television Host, Jay Menon, Animator, Francisco Ruiz (Pacific Rim) Award winning actress, Nathalie Soderqvist (Miss Julie). Award winning DJ, Sasha Robotti. Mr. Kantor is known for representing numerous foreign actors, actresses, producers, directors, cinematographers, stuntmen, make-up artists, and other industry professionals, primarily by obtaining O-1 and O-2 visas and EB-1 Green Cards for these individuals.
We have established excellent working relationships with the AMPTP, SAG-AFTRA, DGA, and IATSE so that we can obtain "No Objection" letters promptly. When time is an issue - we can deliver prompt results from Immigration. In emergency situations, we were able to obtain an O-1 visa within a week.

Award Winning Actress Nathalie Soderqvist

Award Winning Stuntwoman Zoe Bell


Even if you haven't won a major award such as an Oscar or an Emmy, we still may be able to obtain an O-1 Visa or EB-1 Green Card for you. Use the law firm that the stars rely on - Go with the leading authority in the field of O-1 visas - Go with ELI KANTOR.
CALL NOW TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY -
(310) 274-8216
Since the Entertainment Industry is Global, We have represented individuals from all over the world including:
* United Kingdom
* France
* Germany
* Spain
*Sweeden
* Canada
* Mexico
* Argentina
*China
*Taiwan
*Australia
* Singapore
* Malaysia
*New Zeland
SUCCESS STORIES
When Legendary Pictures was filming Godzilla, it started production on Vancouver Island in Canada. When it shifted production to Hawaii, we had to obtain 42 visas for the cast and crew. The union, IATSE, objected that Legendary should hire local American workers in Hawaii for the "below the line employees." However, we were able to overcome their objections by arguing that we needed to ensure "continuity of production" by having the same crew that was familiar with the director's style, and also because we had already obtained security clearances from the Air Force to enter the Air Force base to film. The result - Immigration issued all 42 visas.
 
 A successful actor from Singapore had previously received an O-1 visa, yet when we applied for a Green Card for him as an EB-1 Alien of Extraordinary Ability, we received an extensive Request for Evidence "RFE" questioning his abilities. Nevertheless, we were able to overcome the RFE by establishing that an award ceremony in Malaysia where he was a "presenter" was equivalent to the Academy Awards in Malaysia. 
When Marcus Alexander, a successful 3-D producer, who had previously obtained an O-1 Visa, wanted to obtain a green card, we filed an EB-1 petition for him, as an alien of extraordinary ability. However, Immigration sent us a lengthy Request For Evidence "RFE". We were able to overcome it, by explaining to Immigration that the field of 3-Dimensional movies was relatively new and, therefore, the Academy Awards did not have a special category for it. We also submitted additional evidence of his writing about 3-D motion pictures, and he received his green card. Now, he is not tied to any one project or studio, and is able to work anywhere.
TESTIMONIALS
LAWYER'S LAWYER!
I am the General Counsel of an entertainment company, who was referred to Eli by one of the outside law firms I retain. The visa was for one of our key overseas employees who we needed to bring to the US. Eli promptly answered all of my questions and diligently followed up with Immigration and the State Department. Eli was able to obtain a work visa for our employee in a very complex case. Eli is a true professional who knows Immigration Law inside and out. I highly recommend him.
Posted by Annie 11/2016
BEST LAWYER IN TOWN
Eli Kantor was by far the best lawyer I know. I am an executive at an entertainment production company. After researching, interviewing and meeting with several lawyers to assist me apply for my Green card, Eli Kantor stood out to me. He's responsible, very detailed and organized, prepared my case with care and recommendations. I got the Green card approved in no time. Thanks to Eli, I highly recommend anyone looking for immigration visa to go to him.
Posted by Christie 11/27/2017
BENEFITS OF AN O-1 VISA
* Unlike the H-1B visa that has an annual quota of 65,000 plus 20,000 visas for masters degree and PhD holders, there is no annual quota.
* There is no minimum education requirement.
* They can be issued relatively quickly.
* O-1 visas can be issued for up to 3 years and can be extended indefinitely as long as you have projects.
* O-1 visas allow you to work for more than one employer if your agent obtained it for you.
* You can bring your team/support personnel with you on an O-2 visa.
* You can bring your spouse and children under 21 with you on an O-3 visa.

O-1B  VISA: EXTRAORDINARY ABILITY (ARTS, MOTION PICTURE, OR TELEVISION)
 
The O-1 category also applies to aliens who are coming temporarily and have extraordinary ability in the arts or extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry.

Petition Document Requirements

A U.S. employer should file the I-129 petition with:
  • A written advisory opinion, describing the alien’s ability as follows:

    • If the petition is based on the alien’s extraordinary ability in the arts, the consultation must be from a peer group (including labor organizations) in the alien’s field of endeavor, or a person or persons designated by the group with expertise in the alien’s area of ability.
    • If the petition is based on the alien’s extraordinary achievements in the motion picture or television industry, separate consultations are required from a labor and a management organization with expertise in the alien’s field of endeavor.
  • A copy of any written contract between the employer and the alien or a summary of the terms of the oral agreement under which the alien will be employed;
  • Evidence the alien has received, or been nominated for, significant national or international awards or prizes in the particular field, such as an Academy Award, Emmy, Grammy or Director’s Guild Award, or evidence of at least three of the following:

    • Performed or will perform services as a lead or starring participant in productions or events which have a distinguished reputation as evidenced by critical reviews, advertisements, publicity releases, publications, contracts or endorsements;
    • Achieved national or international recognition for achievements, as shown by critical reviews or other published materials by or about the individual in major newspapers, trade journals, magazines, or other publications;
    • A record of major commercial or critically acclaimed successes, as shown by such indicators as title, rating or standing in the field, box office receipts, motion picture or television ratings and other occupational achievements reported in trade journals, major newspapers or other publications;
    • Received significant recognition for achievements from organizations, critics, government agencies or other recognized experts in the field in which the alien is engaged, with the testimonials clearly indicating the author’s authority, expertise and knowledge of the alien’s achievements;
    • A high salary or other substantial remuneration for services in relation to others in the field, as shown by contracts or other reliable evidence; or
Note: If the above standards do not readily apply to the alien’s occupation, the petitioner may submit comparable evidence in order to establish the alien’s eligibility.

Standard for Professional Publications

In Russell v. I.N.S., No. 98 C 6132, 2001 WL 11055 (N.D. Ill. Jan. 4, 2001) the District Court rejected INS’s position that articles from Chicago newspapers did not demonstrate that Russell had “major media” attention because the newspapers were not national media. The Court noted: “Nowhere in the relevant language of the INS regulation is there a requirement that the submitted media publications be from news outlets throughout the country”.

Thus, USCIS should focus on the circulation of the publication, of the editorial influence of the media source, rather than solely whether the publication is national in scope.

Further, there is no requirement that published material be primarily about the beneficiary and the beneficiary’s work. In Muni v. I.N.S., 891 F. Supp. 440 (N.D. Ill. 1995), the Court held that “published material about [Muni] in professional or major trade publications or other major media, relating to [his] work in the field for which classification is sought” was sufficient to satisfy this criterion. The Court noted that the “articles do not establish that Muni is one of the stars… but that is not the applicable standard”.

Instead, the court found that “the articles Muni submitted, which appeared in various newspapers and hockey magazines, clearly fit the requirement”.

A similar holding was set in Racine v. INS, 1995 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 4336 at 17, 1995 WL 153319 at 6 (N.D. III 1995). There, the Court found that “INS was not following its own regulations when it held that there are no articles which state that Racine is ‘one of the best in the field'”. Like the Court in Muni, Racine held that “articles [that] … demonstrate his work within his field” were sufficient to meet this criterion.

Importance of Expert Letters

While expert letters by themselves are not conclusive evidence of extraordinary ability, such letters often summarize and explain the documentary evidence submitted. Unchallenged testimony cannot be rejected outright. Banks v. Gonzales, 453 F.3d 449, 453-54 (7th Cir. 2006). The determination of the credibility of documentary evidence should be the same as the determination of the credibility of testimony and therefore, an adverse decision must be based on “specific, cogent reasons that bear legitimate nexus to the finding” Zahedi v. INS, 222 F.3d 1157, 1165 (9th Cir. 2000).

In other words, an expert letter may not be dismissed without a specific, cogent reason for finding that it is not credible evidence in support of the petition.

USCIS has a long history of accepting expert letter as evidence. A number of non-precedent AAO decisions confirm this trend. See, e.g., Matter of [name not provided], 1997 WL 33171069 (AAO 1997); Matter of [name not provided], AAU LIN 95 08951447, 1997 WL 33171273 (AAO 1997).

In addition, the Court in Buletini v. I.N.S., 860 F. Supp. 1222 (E.D. Mich. 1994) held that expert statements respecting the petitioner’s contributions must be fully considered, even if the expert opinions came from people who knew or had worked with the beneficiary.

Similarly, the Court in Muni v. I.N.S. found that dismissal of expert letters without full consideration was “clear evidence that [the INS] did not adequately evaluate the facts before it. See also Racine v. INS, 1995 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 4336, 1995 WL 153319 (N.D. III Feb. 16, 1995).

Failure to consider expert testimony and/or affidavits is a violation of Due Process. Tun v. Gonzales, 485 F.3d 1014 (8th Cir. 2007); Rodriguez Galicia v. Gonzales, 422 F.3d 529, 538-40 (7th Cir. 2005); Lopez-Umanzor v. Gonzales, 405 F.3d 1049, 1056-58 (9th Cir. 2005); McDonalds v. Gonzales, 400 F.3d 684, 687-88 (9th Cir. 2005).

Consultation

A written advisory opinion from a peer group (including labor organizations) or a person with expertise in the beneficiary’s area of ability. If the O-1 petition is for an individual with extraordinary achievement in motion picture or television, the consultation must come from an appropriate labor union and a management organization with expertise in the beneficiary’s area of ability.

When a consultation includes a watermark or other distinctive marks to confirm the authenticity of the document, petitioners should submit to USCIS the version containing the watermark or other distinctive marks. Copies of documents that do not contain the appropriate watermark or other distinctive marks may raise doubts about the authenticity of the document and may result in processing delays. For example, USCIS may request that the petitioner submit the original version of the document. To avoid processing delays, petitioners should ensure that they submit the appropriate version and that any associated watermark or other distinctive marks are legible.   

Exceptions to the Consultation Requirement

If the petitioner can demonstrate that an appropriate peer group, including a labor organization, does not exist, then the decision will be based on the evidence of record.
A consultation may be waived for an alien with extraordinary ability in the field of arts if the alien seeks readmission to perform similar services within 2 years of the date of a previous consultation.  Petitioners should submit a waiver request and a copy of the previous consultation with the petition.
Contract between petitioner and beneficiary
A copy of any written contract between the petitioner and the beneficiary or a summary of the terms of the oral agreement under which the beneficiary will be employed.
NOTE:  USCIS will accept an oral contract, as evidenced by the summation of the elements of the oral agreement.  Such evidence may include but is not limited to: emails between the contractual parties, a written summation of the terms of the agreement, or any other evidence which demonstrates that an oral agreement was created.
The summary of the terms of the oral agreement must contain: 
what was offered by the employer
what was accepted by the employee
The summary does not have to be signed by both parties to establish the oral agreement.  However, it must document the terms of the employment offered and that the beneficiary has agreed to the offer.
Itineraries
An explanation of the nature of the events or activities, the beginning and ending dates for the events or activities, and a copy of any itinerary for the events or activities, if applicable (see the memorandum “Clarifying Guidance on “O” petition Validity Period” (PDF, 57 KB)). The petitioner must establish that there are events or activities in the beneficiary’s field of extraordinary ability for the validity period requested, e.g. an itinerary for a tour or a series of events.
Agents 
A U.S. Agent may be the actual employer of the beneficiary, the representative of both the employer and the beneficiary, or a person or entity authorized by the employer to act for, or in place of, the employer as its agent.
Agent for Multiple Employers
Please note that a petitioner who will be filing as an agent for multiple employers must establish that it is duly authorized to act as an agent for the other employers.  The required conditions can be found on the “Requirements for Agents and Sponsors Filing as Petitioners for the O and P Visa Classifications” (PDF, 890 KB) page. 
Additionally, agents filing I-129 petitions for multiple employers must include with the petition:
Supporting documentation including a complete itinerary of the event or events which specifies the dates of each service or engagement, the names and addresses of the actual employers, and the names and addresses of the establishments, venues, or locations where the services will be performed
Contracts between the actual employers and the beneficiary; and
An explanation of the terms and conditions of the employment with required documentation. 
Once the visa petition is approved by USCIS, the beneficiary can apply at a U.S. embassy or consulate for the visa.  Department of State (DOS) establishes visa application processing and issuance fees.  For more information on visa application processing and issuance fees, see the “Department of State Consular Affairs webpage: www.travel.state.gov”.
Agent Performing the Function of an Employer
An I-129 filed by an agent performing the function of an employer must include:
The contractual agreement between the agent and the beneficiary which specifies the wage offered and the other terms and conditions of employment. This can be a summary of the terms of the oral agreement or a written contract. A contract is not required between the beneficiary and the entities that will ultimately use the beneficiary’s services.
A petition which requires the alien to work in more than one location must include an itinerary with the dates and locations of work. There are no exceptions to the itinerary requirement when the petition is filed by an agent performing the function of an employer. However, USCIS does give some flexibility to how detailed the itinerary must be and does take into account industry standards when determining whether the itinerary requirement has been met.  As such, the itinerary should at a minimum indicate what type of work the beneficiary will be engaged, where, and when this work will take place. 
Please note that USCIS relies on the contractual agreement that must be provided with the petition to determine whether the agent is functioning as the employer of the beneficiary.   The contractual agreement should establish the type of working relationship between the agent and beneficiary and should clearly lay out how the beneficiary will be paid.   In totality, if the terms and conditions of employment show a level of control over the beneficiary’s work being relinquished to the agent, then the agent may establish that it is performing the function of an employer.   This determination will be on a case by case basis and will be based on the contractual agreement, whether written or oral. 
The petition must be submitted with evidence regarding the wage offered.  However, the regulations do not contain a prevailing wage requirement.  Furthermore, no particular wage structure is required.  A detailed description of the wage offered or fee structure and that the wage offered/ fee structure was agreed upon may satisfy this requirement.

Agent for Foreign Employers

Agents filing I-129 petitions for foreign employers must submit the minimum general documentary evidence as required for all O-1 petitions which include:

  • Copies of any written contracts between the foreign employer and the beneficiary or a summary of the terms of the oral agreement under which the beneficiary will be employed
  • An explanation of the nature of the events or activities, the beginning and ending dates for the events or activities, and a copy of any itinerary for the events or activities
  • A written advisory opinion from the appropriate consulting entity or entities.

The regulations do not require any additional documentary requirements for an agent filing on behalf of a foreign employer, however, it is the foreign employer who is responsible for complying with all applicable employer sanctions provisions.

 

O-2 VISA: SUPPORT PERSONNEL

The O-2 category applies to aliens accompanying an O-1 artist or athlete to assist in a specific event or performance.  This person would be acting as an essential and integral part of the artistic or athletic performance of an O-1 artist or athlete because he or she performs support services which cannot be readily performed by a U.S. worker and which are essential to the successful performance of the O-1.


Petition Document Requirements


The petition must be filed by a U.S. employer in conjunction with the filing of the O-1 alien petition and must be filed with:
  • A written advisory opinion.

    • If the O-2 petition is for an alien accompanying an O-1 alien of extraordinary ability in the arts, the opinion must be from a labor organization with expertise in the skill area involved.
    • If the O-2 petition is for an alien accompanying an O-1 alien of extraordinary achievement in the field of motion picture or television, the opinion must be from a labor organization and a management organization with expertise in the skill area involved.
    • The requirements for an advisory opinion letter from the AMPTP may be obtained at
    • http://www.amptp.org/immigration.html
  • Evidence of the current essentiality, critical skills, and experience of the O-2 alien with the O-1 alien, and that the alien has substantial experience utilizing the critical skills and essential support services for the O-1. In the case of a specific motion picture or television production, the evidence shall establish that significant production has taken place outside the U.S., and will take place inside the U.S. and that the continuing participation of the alien is essential to the successful completion of the production.
O-3 VISA: DEPENDENTS

Spouses and minor children (dependents) of O-1’s are admitted under O-3 status with the same restrictions as the principal.  They may not work in the U.S. under this classification.
P-1B VISA: MEMBER OF AN INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED ENTERTAINMENT GROUP
For multiple DJ's in a musical group or other bands, rather than utilizing the more difficult O-1 Visa, the P-1B visa may be the ideal alternative.

The P-1B classification applies to you if you are coming to the United States temporarily to perform as a member of an entertainment group that has been recognized internationally as outstanding in the discipline for a sustained and substantial period of time.

Eligibility Criteria:

  • At least 75 percent of the members of your group must have had a substantial and sustained relationship with the group for at least one year.
  • Your entertainment group must be internationally recognized, having a high level of achievement in a field evidenced by a degree of skill and recognition substantially above that ordinarily encountered.
    • The reputation of the group, not the individual achievements of its members or the acclaim of a particular production, is essential.

Note: Individual entertainers not performing as part of a group are not eligible for this visa classification.

Special Provisions for Certain Entertainment Groups
:

  • Alien circus performers and essential circus personnel are exempt the one year requirement and the internationally recognized requirement.   The alien or aliens must be coming to join a nationally recognized circus.
  • Certain nationally known entertainment groups may have the internationally recognized requirement waived if they can establish they have been recognized nationally as outstanding in its discipline for a sustained amount of time in consideration of special circumstances. 
Application Process

Your U.S. employer must submit:
  • Form I-129, Petition for a Non-Immigrant Worker accompanied by the appropriate fee and supporting documentation.    Please note that if you are a petitioner who will be filing as an agent for multiple employers you must establish that you are duly authorized to act as an agent.  The required conditions can be found at the link to the right (see the memorandum “Requirements for Agents and Sponsors Filing as Petitioners for the O and P Visa Classifications”.
  • A consultation from an appropriate labor organization regarding the nature of the work to be done or a statement proving that the group has been established and performing regularly for a period of at least one year (If no appropriate labor organization exists, this requirement is excused)
Supporting Documents

Form I-129 must include the following documents:

  • Written consultation from an appropriate labor organization
  •  Itinerary with the dates and locations of the performances
  • A copy of the contract between the petitioner and the beneficiary or summary of terms of the oral agreement under which the beneficiary will be employed
  •  Evidence that your group has been established and performing regularly for at least one year
  • Statement from the petitioner listing each member of the group and the exact dates for which each member has been employed on a regular basis by the group
  • Evidence that your group is internationally recognized as outstanding in the discipline for a sustained and substantial period of time as demonstrated by evidence of your group's receipt of, or nomination for, significant international awards or prizes for outstanding achievement in the field, or evidence of at least three of the following:
    • Your group has performed and will perform as a starring or leading entertainment group in production or events which have a distinguished reputation as evidenced by critical reviews, advertisements, publicity releases, publications, contracts, or endorsements
    • Your group has achieved international recognition and acclaim for outstanding achievement in its field as evidenced by reviews in major newspapers, trade journals, magazines or other published material
    • Your group has performed and will perform services as a leading or starring group for organizations and establishments that have a distinguished reputation as evidenced by articles in newspapers, trade journals, publications, or testimonials
    • Your group has a record of major commercial or critically acclaimed successes, as evidenced by indicators such as ratings, box office receipts, record, cassette or video sales, and other achievements as reported in trade journals, major newspapers or other publications
    • Your group has received significant recognition for achievements from critics, organizations, government agencies or other recognized experts in the field
    • Your group has commanded and will command a high salary or other substantial remuneration for services comparable to others similarly situated in the field, as evidenced by contracts or other reliable evidence
  • O1 Processing Time

    On average, the O1 processing time is faster than that of other visas like the H-1B visa. However, you should still allot three to four months for the application to process. Because the I-129 petition’s processing time is dependent on the service center that is responsible for processing it, determining the exact amount of time to expect can be difficult.

    Premium Processing

    If you are pressed for time and have a need to expedite your O1 processing time, then opting for the USCIS premium processing service may be a good option. This feature, for a fee of $1,225, will obligate the USCIS to process your petition in 15 calendar days or less. If it is not processed in this time, the USCIS will refund your fee.

     

    However, many people believe that premium processing will help increase your chances of being approved or even guarantee approval. This has never been the case. Premium processing only speeds up the time it takes the USCIS to come to a decision about your petition.

     

    O-1 Visa Sponsor

    There are typically two types of O-1 visa sponsors–an agent and an employer. An employer, as you may assume, is a company or person that the applicant will be working or providing services to. An agent, on the other hand, is hired in order to represent the applicant’s skills and find them suitable work.


    There are three important components a sponsor will need to provide on behalf of the applicant and they are as follows:


    1) Information such as name, address, tax ID number, gross income, net income, number of employees, etc.

    2) A signed petition request work status for the individual

    3) Good faith to work with them in the manner suggested.

    O-1 Visa Change of Status

    In some cases, an individual on O-1 visa status may seek a change of status (COS) to another non-immigrant status or even permanent residency. This is because the O-1 visa classification is considered to have “dual intent”, meaning that, unlike other work visas like TN and J-1, you are able to pursue your green card while on O-1 status.  If you are in the U.S. and wish to change your status you must first meet the following criteria:

     

  • Have not committed a crime or any other act that would cause them to be ineligible for immigrant benefits

  • There cannot be any outstanding factors that would require them to leave the country prior to changing classifications

  • Has to request a change of status application prior to the expiration date of the I-94

  • Been admitted into the country on a non-immigrant status (like O-1)